On July 3rd, the Republic of Belarus once again celebrated an anniversary of its independence. Or rather, given an economic situation, would it be justifiable to put the word “independence” in quotation marks?

We already talked about this in June, let’s continue the topic.


On July 2nd, on the eve of the holiday celebrating Belarusian statehood, Alexander Lukashenko spoke at a solemn meeting on this very occasion. This is what he said.

“Belarus was raised from the ruins and ashes (after the Great Patriotic War, S.H.) by people who came here to live and work from different parts of the Soviet Union.

Many of them have created families here, built houses, and found a second home.

They have become new post-war generations rooted in this land.”

Tell me what do you hear in his words?

I hear a recognition of the fact that without Soviet internationalism, Belarus, erased by the Nazis to the ground, would never have come back to life. Against this historical background, the following phrases of Lukashenko sound like a call for a reunification, don’t they?

“All this has connected our people with the people of the USSR with blood ties.

That is why the phrase “fraternal nation” for Belarusians is not an empty phrase, or a figure of speech.

This Slavic unity will never be able to be broken and defeated by anyone!”

 

My previous video about a probability of Belarus being accepted as a part of Russia was widely met with “bayonets” by the viewers. And although this video got several times more likes than average, many comments say that this will never happen.

Here are some comments I have got:

“Frankly, to all the “unifiers,” here and in Russia, I would say: a career of any politician in Belarus, who would bring up the idea of joining the Russian Federation, will be immediately over. This is a reality. And your comments about “district or autonomy” only bring up feeling of rage. “

“We’re Belarusians – expletive!!! You have already reunited with Ukraine… You’ll be re-uniting us only in pieces. Also… The part of Belarus that will reunite with you, will be happy to start knifing you.”

“When I read these commentary, I feel terrible… In a blink of an eye your homeland will be given away by a hundred of stupid sheep, for nothing. Believe me, people, there is nothing good in Russia. Being there, will be much worse than it is now. Don’t you understand it? Why my Belarus has such an appalling fate?”

Does this sound familiar?

Like…

“I, myself, am Crimean, a daughter of an officer…”

[Ostashko refers to an epic blunder made by an internet troll working from some NATO military base during the reunification of Crimea. He failed to re-login and was posting anti-reunification posts as a Russian woman from his account as a male American. Since then, a phrase “an officer’s daughter” is used as a marker for Western info-war “warriors”. S.H.]

Or…

“I myself Litvinka, great-granddaughter of Yanka Kupala.”

I will not reply to everyone, otherwise with video will go on for three hours. First, the real sentiments of Belarusians about the reunification with Russia can be found not among anonymous YouTube commentators, some of whom probably write those comments for 3 euro-kopecks per post, but from sociological surveys. Lukashenko knows the results of those surveys, for sure. So, you can make noises all you want here, it won’t affect the reality.

Secondly, vast numbers of Belarusians work in Russia. They don’t just work here, they settle here with us. They get married, buy houses, they stay. They are not rushing back home. Why? In Belarus, it’s very hard to find a job. I also know the state of affairs in Belarusian villages, where they have three students per class in schools.

Let’s be honest, Belarus simply is not making it as an independent nation. It can’t afford it.

Reach people residing in Minsk can squeal that it is not true, because they didn’t learn anything from the experience of the wealthy people in Kiev, but the Belarusian countryside has its own different opinion about the independence. “Europe is the best, the best option for the people,” – squawks a commentator under my first video on this topic. To write something like this statement one must be either a foreign agent, or an alternatively gifted person.

If Ukraine has taught nothing, then look at the Baltics. Do you know what’s going on there? I’ll quote something for you:

“In just 27 years, we lost almost a million inhabitants of Lithuania,” the Director of the European Institute at Kaunas University of technology Vigaudas Usackas doesn’t hide his concern over the situation.

He admitted that able-bodied people aged 15 to 64 years are fleeing the country, while the number of pensioners who left in 2016 was only 1% of the total number of immigrants.

According to the latest data, 57.2 thousand people left Lithuania in 2017, which is comparable to the population of still existing city of Alytus.

The main reason for emigration is the decline of the economy.”

 

Guys, this is what awaits Belarus, if it does not live within its means. Which would mean cutting costs and increasing revenues. Belarusian goods are not needed in the EU, you know this without me. The Russian huge market absorbs everything. But this will continue only on conditions that would convince Moscow that Minsk won’t stab her in the back with a knife by abandoning the “multi-vector politic.”

Do you know why Yeltsin’s family still lives and is not poor, although tens of millions of Russians hate them?

Because, Putin gave them his guarantees, and he keeps his word.

If tomorrow such guarantees will be issued to Lukashenko, who continues to bargain, the Belarusian media will change its tune, and a year later in a referendum on reunification with Russia, people will vote in the same way as they voted at the election of the President of Belarus. I have no idea how it will be packaged in terms of PR, but it is a reality. In popular political Telegram-channels there are endless discussions of an upcoming battle for Belarus. The battle is not military, of course, but political and under the rug.

But it’s coming.

And Lukashenko’s public statements confirm this.

“Moscow is in a hurry to replace Surikov, who shares with Zurabov a title of the worst diplomats of Russia. Babich is in a process of approval. Lukashenko is afraid of a strong ambassador and procrastinates. In 2005, Lukashenko annulled an agreement on the Russian Ambassador Dmitry Ayatskov, who never made it to Minsk. Russia was without an ambassador for several months. Babich’s candidacy was discussed during the last telephone conversation of the presidents. It’s not very clear. Putin is in a hurry before the Duma holiday to appoint a strong diplomat to the Belarusian front. It is the front. In coming months, a tough battle for Belarus will begin.”

“Meanwhile, Lukashenka called the President. In words, he agrees to our terms, with small reservations.”

“After Kyrgyzstan, Armenia and Kazakhstan, Belarus is preparing to purge its elite and reformat its external and, most importantly, its internal agendas.”

In conclusion, a video that will cause not compatible with life trauma to all zmagars. [Zmagars in Belarus are the same type, as Ukros in Ukraine.]

Video was taken in Belarusian Grodno after the Russian national football team victory over the Spaniards.

https://twitter.com/w3c_user/status/1013477878342848512

 

Scott Humor,

the Director of Research and Development

My research of the war on Donbass is available at the saker.community book store

The War on Donbass, which is called by the Western politicians and media the “Russian aggression in Ukraine” was a staged psyop.

My illustrated investigation titled Pokémon in Ukraine reveals how this psyop was staged, by whom and why.

The Essential Saker II: Civilizational Choices and Geopolitics / The Russian challenge to the hegemony of the AngloZionist Empire
The Essential Saker: from the trenches of the emerging multipolar world