Translated and subtitled by Scott Humor

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Soon, Belarus won’t be able to make money on re-export to Ukraine oil products they receive from Russia. The restrictions are temporary, but is it so?

As a known saying goes, there is nothing more permanent than temporary. In Minsk, this saying is also, probably, remembered regarding the Moscow’s decision to ban the supply of gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil that did not resulted in the Belarusian authorities’ enthusiasm.

“Staring with November, Russia will stop deliveries of gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil to Belarus, the restriction will be valid until the end of next year.

The cessation of sales of oil, fuel and gas supplies in excess of volumes required by Belarus for its own consumption has been discussed for a while. Now the decision has been made based on a simple calculation: the new agreements exclude the possibility of “gray” supply schemes of petroleum products within the Union state, which led to lost revenues for the Federal budget of Russia.”

The question seems to be purely economic, but it’s also a reminder that politics is a concentrated expression of economy. It is no secret that saber-rattling Poroshenko in case of an attack on Donbass will require a lot of fuel for the “ATO.”

“According to some reports, Ukraine covered up to 40% of its needs for motor fuel with Russian oil, which was re-exported by Belarus. Advantages for Kiev are obvious: profitable logistics with almost direct deliveries and good prices”.

Agree, the loss of even 1/3 of the volume of cheap fuel is an essential point. Especially when money in the Ukrainian budget isn’t present, and money allocated for continuing war on Donbass by the American sponsors, Poroshenko seeks to pocket to the maximum.

It is one thing to buy cheap fuel from Belarusians, and another thing to buy expensive fuel from the European Union. From where, moreover, much further to the line of contact with the forces of the DPR and LPR, the delivery is more expensive, and logistics of deliveries is more difficult.

In general, Russia’s actions look like a response to the Ukrainian crisis. However, the question remains unsolved: why now? After all, Lukashenko for 4 years profited from the supply of fuel to Kiev, and Moscow allowed this.

Perhaps the religion is the answer. The West provokes a new escalation in Ukraine, making a move by the hands of the Patriarch of Constantinople, who announced the withdrawal of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church from the jurisdiction of the ROC. It is no secret that the attempt to implement this decision may result in the raids of churches and monasteries, which will lead to bloody clashes.

The affairs of the ROC concern our state, as the Church is one of its pillars, and the blow to it is an indirect blow to Russia. It is quite possible that after this attack, it was decided to stop handling the Ukrainian regime with kid gloves and to begin its active suffocation.

One year remans till the “Nord stream 2” will start its operations. The European Union needs to survive only one approaching heating season, after which the issue of dependency for energy supplies on the sitting in Kiev American puppets will be removed from the agenda.

The ban on the re-export of oil products for Poroshenko is the first step to his suffocation. Take a notice that the meeting of the Holy Synod of the ROC was held in Minsk for the first time ever.

“…In Minsk, at a meeting of the Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church, it was decided to completely stop the Eucharistic communion with the Patriarchate of Constantinople. This means a break in relations between the Orthodox churches, the first among equal of Constantinople and the largest of Russia.”

In Minsk, they decided to break off communion with the Constantinople crooks, and to forbid Minsk from supplying fuel for the so called “ATO”. Coincidence? I think not.

The moment when the issue of the Kiev regime will be resolved is steadily approaching.

The Essential Saker II: Civilizational Choices and Geopolitics / The Russian challenge to the hegemony of the AngloZionist Empire
The Essential Saker: from the trenches of the emerging multipolar world