Tag "russian history"

Could there be a grain of truth in the Ukrainian propaganda? (repost with new introduction)

Foreword by the Saker My article about 2016 being a year of triumph for Russia has elicited a number of outright bizarre comments in reaction to my statement that there was no such thing as a “Russian ethnicity”.  Some commentators even made it sound as if I was denying the existence of a unique Russian nation.  Others were shocked by my statement (repeated many times over on this blog) that

25 years after unlawful dissolution of the Soviet Union people are yearning for unity, by Scott Humor

25 years ago a gang of the Communist Party apparatchiks, enemies of people and traitors working for the foreign governments, got together, signed anti Constitutional Belavezha Accords and broke apart Russia, country that our people built and defended for centuries. They forced tens of millions people into territories illegally carved from Russia and separated by artificial borders, languages, and made up laws. These territories were immediately occupied by NATO armies,

Russia celebrates a Unity Day of liberation of Moscow from the Polish Roman Papists army in 1612

The National Unity Day, first celebrated on 4 November 2005, commemorates the popular uprising lead by prince Dmitry Pozharsky and  a meat merchant Kuzma Minin which ejected the alien occupying forces of Polish Roman Papists army from Moscow in November 1612, and more generally the end of the Time of Troubles and foreign interventions in Russia. Its name alludes to the idea that all the classes of the Russian society

Could there be a grain of truth in the Ukrainian propaganda?

We have all heard the Ukrainian nationalist line: they are the true Slavs inheritors of the Kievan Rus while the modern Russians are really either Tatars or Ugro-Finns or God knows what else.  And then there the famous quote by, I think, Napoleon, who said “scratch the Russian and you will find the Tatar”. The interesting thing here is that there might well be some truth to that, and more

Past Russian wars: a quick look at history

The number of well-informed commentators, politicians, blogger and observers who are predicting a war – or at least of a serious risk of war – between Russia and the USA is sharply rising.  Though I myself am rather inclined to believe that the US will use the Ukrainian junta to attack Russia rather then risk a direct confrontation,  I would not go as far as saying that I find a

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